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Livestock Systems

Profitable feeding strategies for smallholder cattle in Indonesia

Project Code: LPS/2013/021
Budget:
A$1,800,088
Research Program Manager: Dr. Anna Okello
Project Leader: Dennis Poppi - University of Queensland
Duration:
JAN 2017
2019
DEC 2020
Project Status: Legally Committed/Active
Map
map_lps-2013-021
Key partners
Assessment Institute for Agricultural Technology
NTB
Balai Pengkajian Teknologi Pertanian (BPTP) Central Sulawesi
Balai Pengkajian Teknologi Pertanian (BPTP) NTB
Balai Pengkajian Teknologi Pertanian (BPTP). Malang East Java
Balai Pengkajian Teknologi Pertanian Yogyakarta
Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries
Northern Territory
University of Brawijaya
University of Gadjah Mada
University of Jember
University of Mataram
University of Tadulako
DOCUMENTS

Overview 

This project is improving the profitability of beef cattle production of small-scale beef producers in Indonesia through the development of simple cost-effective feed rations. 

The Indonesian Government has placed a high priority on self-sufficiency in beef production where domestic beef supply is unable to meet consumer demand. 

Most cattle are raised by 4.2 million smallholder farmers and landless producers, with an increasing number of small- to medium-scale feedlots. The priority is to increase this number, improve reproductive efficiency and improve the growth and fattening of cattle. 

Although there is substantial trade in cattle feed, cattle growth rates are low. Diets are based on the cheapest available feed. This is mainly due to a poor understanding of the benefits of improved diets (for increased growth rates and decreased cost per weight gain), aversion to risk and a lack of tools to formulate a simple diet based on nutritional principles. 

There is a need to customise diets for different regions in Indonesia as each has a different range of feed resources, both on-farm and purchased feeds.
 

Expected project outcomes

  • Improved reproduction and growth of cattle – potential for growth rates to double and for cattle production to increase by 53%.
  • Economic and other benefits to smallholders, landless cattle producers and small- to medium-scale feedlots.
  • Increased household incomes.
  • Increased availability of quality cattle to meet domestic supply.
  • Increased capacity for a new generation of ruminant nutritionists to continue the development of local cattle production systems.
  • Potential for off-farm employment opportunities through implementation of commercial feed enterprises.