Livestock Systems

Enhancing transboundary livestock disease risk management in Lao PDR

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Project code
AH/2012/067
Budget
AUD 1,249,999
Research program manager
Dr Anna Okello
Project leader
Russell Bush - University of Sydney
Duration:
FEB 2015
JAN 2020
Project status
Concluded
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Overview

This project is improving smallholder livelihoods by improving transboundary animal disease risk-management and enabling the sustainable expansion and development of the livestock industry in Laos.

Laos remains one of the poorest countries in the world with a high rate of rural poverty and threat of food insecurity. Increased livestock health and productivity can improve rural household incomes and livelihoods within the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS). 

Constraints to large ruminant production could be addressed through the adoption of a systems approach to deliver health, biosecurity and production interventions and improved farmer knowledge, attitude and practice. 

The constant threat of transboundary animal diseases including foot-and-mouth disease limits opportunities for expansion of the livestock industry.

This project aims to develop and test a ‘whole of village biosecurity program’ for pigs, poultry, goats, cattle and buffalo; strengthen current disease event reporting and emergency response systems; and develop a communication strategy for a widespread public awareness biosecurity campaign, potentially applicable to the Greater Mekong Subregion.  

Expected outcomes

  • Improved livestock health and productivity.
  • Increased net incomes for rural households from rural employment and business activities.
  • Reductions in rural poverty and increased lifestyle opportunities, including education.
  • Opportunities for secondary employment for adults.
  • Better-targeted use of feed resources.
  • Improved use of livestock manure for biogas production and fertiliser.
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Key partners
Department of Livestock and Fisheries
Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry
National Agriculture and Forestry Research Institute
National University of Laos
Documents
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Fact sheet LPS/2012/067