Fisheries

Improving technical and institutional capacity to support development of mariculture based livelihoods and industry in New Ireland, Papua New Guinea

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Project code
FIS/2014/061
Program
Budget
AUD 1,741,604
Research program manager
Prof. Ann Fleming
Project leader
Paul Southgate - University of Sunshine Coast
Duration:
MAR 2016
SEP 2020
Project status
Legally committed/Active
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Overview

Communities along Papua New Guinea’s (PNG) vast coastline, dependent on marine resources for their livelihoods, will benefit from this targeted mariculture project.

Mariculture is a branch of aquaculture involving the cultivation of marine organisms for food and other products. Traditionally, the sea cucumber provided income to local communities, but overfishing resulted in a nationwide moratorium. 

Increasing capacity within partner country organisations, and with coastal communities to better use the economic potential and livelihood opportunities of the mariculture industry in New Ireland, is a priority. 
 

Expected project outcomes

  • Further development of community-based mariculture and improved livelihood opportunities. 
  • Attainment of extensive information relating to the feasibility of various potential mariculture activities with emphasis on village-based culture systems. 
  • Greater institutional awareness of regional mariculture potential and improved capabilities to support sustainable mariculture development and increased household livelihood opportunities. 
  • Improved mariculture production methods for sea cucumbers and ornamental species which both support fledgling industries in Australia, and potential for trade development with the Australian aquarium supply industry. 
  • Greater community awareness of mariculture opportunities in PNG, where there is no real mariculture tradition. 
  • Potential income generation opportunities for women and young people.
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Key partners
James Cook University
National Fisheries Authority
Documents
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fact sheet placeholder image
Fact sheet FIS/2014/061